Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web book. Happy reading Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web Pocket Guide.

To understand the professional struggles and work that went into making the open Web I know today is a gem. The only thing I didn't like was that he spent too much time on small technical details such as URI. I know it was important but a few sentences would have done. There were a few other technical points that were drawn out. Anyone that wasn't technical would have been lost and those who already have some background in the Web would have been bored at the repetition.

Overall it was a solid book and I am grateful the creator of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee, gave his first hand account of why and how it come to be. Apr 09, Ruby rated it really liked it. Here I am, reading a book about web which was written in nearly 20 years ago, but still is as touching and interesting as it can be.

It was an amazing experience to read about the creation of the web and the struggles Tim Berners-Lee had when trying to make his idea come true.

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I am from the web-generation, we are the people who were born after the web and grew up with it. We observed web becoming more powerful, yet we also can see what's going on now and how the initial idea of sharing the knowl Here I am, reading a book about web which was written in nearly 20 years ago, but still is as touching and interesting as it can be.

We observed web becoming more powerful, yet we also can see what's going on now and how the initial idea of sharing the knowledge is fading, as the commercialization rate is growing. Tim Berners-Lee is not only a great mind, but also an amazing individual. We are in , Berners-Lee goes about telling an honest account on how the www started. Sharing the hurdles to get funding at CERN and to convince people to use the system; phone book was the killer application.

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His colleagues even made jokes about the "world wide web" name and he had to move to MIT to start the W3C. Heck, is pretty damn hard change the world. Jan 20, Vera rated it it was ok Shelves: computer-science. In this book, Tim Berners-Lee describes the history of the World Wide Web, sprinkled with a lot of his more philosophical ideas about the destiny of the Web. It starts off quite slow with him stuck at CERN, which is a creative environment where he is more or less free to work on his pet project, but nobody is really backing his ideas or seeing their true potential.

It is quite frustrating to read about how hard it was to get his project off the ground or the "bobsled" going, as Tim himself phra In this book, Tim Berners-Lee describes the history of the World Wide Web, sprinkled with a lot of his more philosophical ideas about the destiny of the Web. It is quite frustrating to read about how hard it was to get his project off the ground or the "bobsled" going, as Tim himself phrases it. The pace picks up a bit with the founding of the W3C and makes for an interesting second third.

In the last third, the book mostly dissolves into rambling about his personal ideas and opinions and projections for the future which were not that interesting to me and some didn't seem to have aged very well -- such as his excitement for Java applets. His musings about the potential power of the Semantic Web, which span two chapters, were a bit uninteresting to me as well. I give this book such a low rating because it contains less technical detail than I had hoped -- actually, almost none. Still, I quite enjoyed parts of the recollection of the history of the Web as well as the chapter about privacy and security on the Web.

I would not recommend reading this unless for some reason you are deeply interested in the personal philosophical convictions of Tim Berners-Lee. He is a humanitarian. He foresaw the good and the bad his technology would bring and worked hard to stave off the worse elements. I can only thank him for my career and the gifts he bestowed upon humanity. It is now in our hands to make sure it does more good than harm. This is a must read book, especially if you do any work in technology.

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Sep 02, Michael rated it liked it. I was surprised at how readable this was, and then surprised at how the author ties his belief in the Web to Unitarian Universalist beliefs. His arguments for a semantic web that will, in some ways, supplant and assist the role of human intuition seems to articulate the way information technology has actually been used to control us, unfortunately. The father of the Web has written about the next step in the evolution of the Internet.

He remembers the past with some fun stories and then talks about the future, but the problem with visionaries is that they sound like lunatics until the future is actually here and everybody's using it. Dec 14, Kevin rated it really liked it Shelves: technology. Very interesting for a look into the history of the the web's creation and its spread. The latter chapters haven't aged well. Overly optimistic where is the semantic web these days?

Written in accessible, not-overly-technical prose, this is an interesting look at the history of the Web and Berners-Lee's predictions and hopes for its future back in Mar 21, Vilmibm rated it liked it. Jul 06, Hidde rated it it was amazing. Full of interesting back stories and design decisions for the Web, recommended! Nov 30, Nolan Egly rated it liked it. Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, recounts the history of how the Web was initially inspired, championed as a worthwhile project while working at the international research facility CERN, slowly grown in and outside of CERN, and eventually became governed by a new consortium the W3C still in effect today.

The book is not a technical manual, and is meant to be an account readable by laypeople. Tim starts by describing his need to link disparate types of information together Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, recounts the history of how the Web was initially inspired, championed as a worthwhile project while working at the international research facility CERN, slowly grown in and outside of CERN, and eventually became governed by a new consortium the W3C still in effect today.

Tim starts by describing his need to link disparate types of information together when joining CERN in order to keep track of people, projects, and software. He points to no "eureka" moment, but describes a slow accretion of ideas that became his vision of a universal communication medium. The basic principles that define the web today - decentralized participants and a minimal hypertext language allowing maximum flexibility of organization and content - were born from the environment of disparate computer systems and data formats at CERN.

Over time he tirelessly worked to show other CERN members the potential of his system. He also approached various outside companies with similar document management products to try and convince them to integrate with the internet. Interestingly enough, Tim originally envisioned a web browser that could also edit content, not just browse it. While no major browser today does this, that collaborative capability exists today as the wiki. As the web exploded and different companies all saw the potential to somehow make the web "theirs", Tim reached out to MIT to start a consortium to be a neutral overseer.

He was more concerned with keeping the web independent and universal for everyone than trying to profit from his creation.

Weaving the Web

The history closes at the publication date of , with Tim discussing the challenges facing the internet then, many of which are still in play today such as domain speculation, privacy issues, and censorship. He candidly acknowledges some problems are human and have no easy technical solution. Tim ends with a forward looking vision where computers can analyze the web as semantic content by themselves in a way that reminds me of the vaulted goals of artificial intelligence and expert systems in decades past.

I was personally impressed with Tim's character throughout. He spends no time boring readers with talk about his intelligence or brilliance, but gives many pages of credit to past researchers with similar ideas and people who helped or contributed to the web as he labored on it. The book was definitely informative and provided interesting insights into the process that birthed the internet, and the character of the primary coordinator. It is not told in an exciting or engaging way but because the book is short this is not a serious detraction. It's not a technical book, but some readers might get overwhelmed by all the technical names.

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I would recommend this book to anyone in the computer industry, and anyone with a general interest in the history of science or technology. Millions of people use the internet everyday but most of them don't know the history of it or how it works. It is a first hand account of how the World Wide web was born. The book is about the journey that Tim Berner's Lee took to create the world wide web today as we know it.

The research Millions of people use the internet everyday but most of them don't know the history of it or how it works. The researchers had accumulated a vast amount of data stored on computers and Tim and his partner started a small side project of organizing all the data, making it reachable to anyone at the facility.


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The original project Tim had made was called NeXT which was a very simple server that would allow anyone in the facility with a working computer terminal to route to the server and access the data. Tim knew that he was on to something much bigger than just organizing a bunch of data. He knew he could create the world wide web. Tim said that the internet already existed but "One would run one program to connect to another computer, and then in conversation in a different language with the other computer,run a different program to access the information" pg Using the internet as a non technical person was a headache because of this.

In order to make a World Wide Web was to conquer the issue of compatibility and standardized network protocols. Unix was already used all around the world so it was the perfect choice. Subscribe to receive some of our best reviews, "beyond the book" articles, book club info, and giveaways by email. Debut Author. About this Book Summary Excerpt. Book Summary Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide With new online businesses and communities forming every day, the full impact of Berners-Lee's the founder of the World Wide Web grand scheme has yet to be fully known.

Enquire Within upon Everything When I first began tinkering with a software program that eventually gave rise to the idea of the World Wide Web, I named it Enquire, short for Enquire Within upon Everything , a musty old book of Victorian advice I noticed as a child in my parents' house outside London. Read Full Excerpt. Reviews Media Reviews Reader Reviews. Write your own review. Laugh and sob as you read about the information age economy's new dominant class. Non-members are limited to two results. Become a member.

ISTA 120 Presentation (Weaving The Web)

Join Now! Editor's Choice Kochland by Christopher Leonard. Book Club. Win this book! Full access is for members only. Consequently, myths and misconceptions about the origins, impact and future of this technology have run wild. Now, for the first time, the world hears from the man who invented the WWW. English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee quietly laid the groundwork for the WWW and consequently Hypertext in , created a prototype in , and unleashed it to the public in